Processing software and projects

Last update : January 21, 2014

Processing Software Logo

Processing Software Logo

Processing is an open source programming language and environment for people who want to create images, animations, and interactions. Since 2001, Processing has promoted software literacy within the visual arts and visual literacy within technology. Initially created to serve as a software sketchbook and to teach computer programming fundamentals within a visual context, Processing evolved into a development tool for professionals.

Processing is an open project initiated by Ben Fry and Casey Reas. It evolved from ideas explored in the Aesthetics and Computation Group at the MIT Media Lab. The current version is 2.1, released on October 27, 2013.

The following websites help to learn processing :

Google text to speech (TTS) with processing

Referring to the post about Google STT, this post is related to Google speech synthesis with processing. Amnon Owed presented in November 2011 processing code snippets to make use of Google’s text-to-speech webservice. The idea was born in the processing forum.

The sketch makes use of the Minim library that comes with Processing. Minim is an audio library that uses the JavaSound API, a bit of Tritonus, and Javazoom’s MP3SPI to provide an easy to use audio library for people developing in the Processing environment. The author of Minim is Damien Di Fede (ddf), a creative coder and composer interested in interactive audio art and music games. In November 2009, Damien was joined by Anderson Mills who proposed and co-developed the UGen Framework for the library.

I use the Minim 2.1.0 beta version with this new UGen Framework. I installed the Minim library in the libraries folder in my sketchbook and deleted the integrated 2.0.2 version in the processing (2.0b8) folder modes/java/libraries.

Today I run succesful trials with the english, french and german Google TTS engine. I am impressed by the results.

Google speech to text (STT) with processing

Processing is an open source programming language and environment for people who want to create images, animations, and interactions.

Florian Schulz, Interaction Design Student at FH Potsdam, presented a year ago in the processing forum a speech to text (STT) library, based on the Google API. The source code is available at GitHub, a project page provides additional informations. The library is based on an article of Mike Pultz, named Accessing Google Speech API / Chrome 11, published in March 2011.

I installed the library in my processing environment (version 2.0b8) and run the test examples with success. I did some trials with the french and german Google speech recognition engines. I am impressed by the results.

Additional informations about this topic are provided in the following link list :

 

Processing and Eclipse

Last update : January 21, 2014

Processing is an open source programming language and environment for people who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It is used by students, artists, designers, researchers, and hobbyists for learning, prototyping, and production.

Processing is an open project initiated by Ben Fry and Casey Reas. It evolved from ideas explored in the Aesthetics and Computation Group at the MIT Media Lab. Development of Processing began formally in the Spring of 2001, the first alpha release 0001 was used in August 2001, the version 1.0 was released on 24th November 2008, a few days after the last beta version (release 157). Version 2 was released on September 5, 2013. The current version is 2.1 launched on October 27, 2013.

Processing programs can be easely exported to run on the web as Jas applications to run on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X or Android, as Java applets / Java projects or as Javascript web projects. Processing scripts are called sketches. Sometimes it might be useful to combine a Processing sketch with a general Java project, which is best done in Eclipse.

A tutorial how to use Processing in Eclipse is available on the Processing website. The following code has been saved as file MyEclipseSketch.java and runs succesfully as applet in Eclipse.

import processing.core.*;
public class MyFirstSketch extends PApplet{

public void setup() {
size (400,400);
background(0);
}
public void draw() {
stroke (255);
if (mousePressed) {
line (mouseX,mouseY,pmouseX,pmouseY);
}
}
}

To embed the applet in a webpage, the generated MyEclipseSketch.class file was added to the Processing archive core.jar and I renamed the archive file to eclipse_sketch.jar. The html code to display the applet is very easy :

<html>
<header>
</header>
<body>
<applet code=”MyEclipseSketch.class” archive=”eclipse_sketch.jar”/>
</body>
</html>

Voronoi Fractal

A Voronoi diagram is created from a set of points by dividing the plane into regions, where each region consists of the area closest to one of the points. Ken Shirriff published a paper about voronoi fractals ten years ago. Frederik Van Houtte from Belgium created a nice applet with the processing language to generate online voronoi fractals.

Click the applet to generate a new fractal.

A description of the project and the source code are published on Frederiks weblog under a  a Creative Commons license.